PCCs THAT NEVER WERE (What if?) PROJECT

St.-Petersburg Tram Collection presents a fun project called "PCCs THAT NEVER WERE". This is a very limited series of the PCC cars that never were but each model is based on the real facts of the PCC history.

Ref Description Limited edition of

901

USA1945 New Orleans Public Service Inc. Pullman-Standard PCC (ex-Dallas, 1020-1044 series; acq. in 1954)

The Dallas Railway & Terminal Co. (DR&T) advertised its twenty-five double-ended PCCs for sale in July 1954 when they were only nine years old and New Orleans Public Service Inc. considered acquired them to replace some of its old streetcars on the two existed Canal and St.Charles streetcar lines. However, the narrow rear doors have seemed impractical and DR&T offer was declined. Instead, NOPSI decided to buy GM "king-size" TDH-5105 buses and between 1954 and 1957 182 GMs were delivered to the company.



Possible numbers in New Orleans (the lowest unused in group of 400-1099 allocated to double truck cars): 1020-1044.

Scale 1:48
Available Now
Available through SPTC, U.S.A./Canada Dealers



10

902

USA1946 Baltimore Transit Co. Pullman-Standard All-electric PCC (7200 & 7600-series) - NCL paint scheme.

The Baltimore all-electric PCCs could called as "PCC that Almost Was". The board of Directors of Baltimore Transit Co. authorised the purchase one hundred all-electric PCCs from Pullman-Standard on May 4, 1944 and order was placed with Pullman in late 1944. The electrical equipment should be divided between GE and Westinghouse following Baltimore practice, but the exact number of cars in each group is unknown. These cars should be equipped for MU operation. However, by late 1945 the National City Lines had acquired operation control of BTCo and had installed Fred A. Nolan as president of the Maryland system. In the same year the order for 100 all-electics was cancelled, however the construction has begun at Pullman at this time and at least four body shells were in various stages of construction for BTCo and parts on hand for many other cars. To get rid of this material Pullman offered both Cleveland Transit System and Boston Elevated Railway very short lead times as the line was about to go into full production and quite a price deal if they would take the Baltimore-design car. As a result, Cleveland ordered 50 cars and Boston 25 cars. One of the almost completed cars was allegedly built as Boston 3218 (this particular car had a hole in the floor for a bell tap for a rear gong in front of the rear seat as all Batimore cars had) and remaining became Cleveland cars. When the order was cancelled, 25 sets of MU equipment and couplers were already in hand in Baltimore and they were sold later to Twin Cities Rapid Transit to put on their cars going to Shaker Heights.

Scale 1:48
Available Now
Available through SPTC, Upside/DownUnder

25

902-0

USA1946 Baltimore Transit Co. Pullman-Standard All-electric PCC (7200 & 7600-series) - BTCo Alexandria Blue livery.

The "Fruid Salad" paint scheme was introduced on Baltimore PCC cars in 1946 and new all-electric PCCs if delivered were very likely painted in this livery. But if Baltimore Transit Co. specified the pre-war Alexandria Blue livery for its new all-electric PCC cars, they may lookes like this.

Scale 1:48
Available Now
Available through SPTC, Upside/DownUnder

5

902-1

USA1946 Baltimore Transit Co. Pullman-Standard All-electric PCC (7200 & 7600-series) - Final BTCo livery.

 

Scale 1:48
Available Now
Available through SPTC, Upside/DownUnder

15

903

SpainUSAWiener Stadtwerker Verkehrsbetriebe St.Louis Car Co. PCC (ex-D.C. Transit, Z2 class, acq. in 1960/61).

In mid-50s, the Vienna tram system needed the new cars to replace the old rolling stock. Between 1954 and 1959 the Wiener Stadtwerker Verkehrsbetriebe acquired sixty large capacity motor cars and number of matching trailers, rebuilt many old cars with new bodies and in 1957 received a first articulated tram in Austria, built by Graf & Stift company, using parts from old trams. In 1959 first two articulated trams, built by Austrian Lohner company on Duwag license were delivered to Vienna. However, the company still needed more cars to replace old trams, especially because it was announced that the speed restrictions on cars without track brakes will be entered in January 1961. In 1949 the company acquired 42 second-hand cars from New York's Third Avenue Transit System (Type Z, 4201-4242 series) and in August 1955 the Vienna delegation visited United States in order to study the possible purchase the used PCCs. The Washington cars were the most suitable because of its shorter length, however they were wider than regular Vienna cars (2.5 m instead of regular 2.2 m Vienna standard; however ex-TARS cars were already 2,494 m wide), but could be operated without problems in the Floridsdorf area, where the ex-New York cars were already in service. The front entrance and cente exit floor plan was non-standard for Vienna with its rear entrance, front exit scheme, but it seems that in mid-50s the company was almost ready to live with this and intended to buy at least 100 used PCCs from Washington, D.C. There were a number of additional consultations and by end of 1950s the company already received the authorization from Vienna Municipal Council to purchased 200 PCC trucks, track brakes, motors and control gears from D.C Transit to be used on new cars bodies, produced in Austria locally. These cars, called in Vienna as "Halbamerikaners" should be produced started from 1961. In November 1960 the delegation from Vienna visited Washington to discuss all details with D.C. Transit officials and also to inspect the PCC cars for possible purchase as well. The sale never came about, because the company's experts recommended not to buy the used PCC cars and equipment and buy instead new Duwag articulated cars. They were purchased in quantity, forming the E and E1 classes, still operating in Vienna. The ex-TARS cars in the Florisdorf depot were replaced by F-class articulated cars in 1964.

Scale 1:48
Available Now
Available through SPTC, INTERNATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES

5

904

SpainSU1968/69 Tranvias de Barcelona LM-68 1800-series PCC.

In 1967 the Soviet delegation was invited to the UITP Congress in Barcelona and the Leningrad tram and trolleybus undetaking represented the Soviet Union at the Congress. At this time, the Tranvias de Barcelona had decided to close the tram system in the city. In January 1961 the company ordered first 20 cars from Washington's D.C. Transit System, and purchased 101 cars at total in three lots, 99 of them were placed in service, beign rebuilt by MACOSA company. Some attempts were made to buy the new cars for the system in mid-1960s, but starting from 1965 the remaining network was sistematically withdrawn. At one day during the '67 UITP Congress, relaxed after dinner session, with cuban cigars and french cognac 'steams', the Barcelona tramway company manager Mr. Conde related to its Leningrad colleague Mr. Popov that he was in search of new trams for the system and Mr. Popov said that he is able to offer the new trams to Barcelona. Some months later, the Barcelona company received an offer from Leningrad of new trams for (at that time) 800.000 Pta each with one year guarantee, (a local builder offered them at a 3.450.000 Pta). However, the offer was rejected, as the decision about the closure was taken and, furthermore, it was political reason to reject it, because the very cold relationships between Franco's Spain and Soviet Union. The Barcelona tram system was finally closed on 18th March 1971.

Scale 1:43
Available Now
Available through SPTC, INTERNATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES

5

905

USA1939 East Bay Street Railways St.Louis Car Co. PCC (Job 1613, 1000-1019 series).

Key System Transit Company President, Alfred J. Lundberg, was a member of the development board of the President's Conference Committee and in May 1937 advance royalties were paid on 180 PCC cars by Key's parent company, the Railway Equipment & Realty Co. Twenty sets of PCC electrical equipment were ordered from Westinghouse. The PCC cars were intended for heavy Oakland-Berkeley routes such as Telegraph Ave. and Broadway-College. The St.Louis Car Co. job 1613 is vacant and may have been assigned to Key System order. However, in March 1939, the Railway Equipment & Realty Co. cancelled a proposed appropriation of about $280,000 to purchase 20 PCC cars for use on one line as a test. Actually, the Key System applied its new orange and silver paint scheme to East Bay cars only in 1942, but if new PCC cars were delivered in 1939,they could have the new livery from the beginning to match the Bridge Unit cars.

Scale 1:48
Available Now
Available through SPTC, U.S.A./Canada Dealers

25

905-1

USA1939 Key System Transit Lines St.Louis Car Co. PCC (Job 1613, 1000-1019 series)-post'46 National City Lines livery.

The National City Lines acquired Key System in May 1946 and some Oakland streetcars were repainted to the regular NCL livery of deep yellow, green and white. By November 1948 all streetcar lines in Oakland were abandoned in favour of buses. May be, with modern streamliners on the busiest lines, the rail service could survived under NCL management, as it was in Los Angeles.


Scale 1:48
Available Now
Available through SPTC, U.S.A./Canada Dealers

5

906

USA1947/48 New York City Transit System St.Louis Car Co. PCC (1100-1464 series).

New York's Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia left office in 1945 and shortly the Board of Transportation's in house Surface Lines Rehabilitation Committee proposed the retention of 13 trolley lines and the acquisition of 365 more PCC cars of the post-war design. The PCC lines-to-be were Crosstown, Graham, DeKalb, Putnam, Myrtle-Court, Flatbush Avenue, Flushing Avenue and Flushing-Ridgewood. This large order could be placed to St.Louis Car Co. following the pre-war relationships and they could be numbered 1100-1464 in the New York roster. There was another standee window PCC car in the Brooklyn fleet - the only aluminum PCC 1000, built by Clark in 1936. However, nothing to come: New York City Transit System General Manager Sidney H. Bingham was even more pro-buses than the former mayor and in November 1955 the trolley operation was ended.

Scale 1:48
Available 2007
Available through SPTC, U.S.A./Canada Dealers

10

907

SpainUSA1945 Seoul Korea Electric Co. Pullman-Standard PCC (701-725 series; ex-Dallas).

The streetcar system in Seoul started in 1899 and in the following years was controlled by Japanese companies and most of the Seoul's cars were built in Japan. After the World War 2, only 30 cars were in operating condition but with American help one hundred cars were put back in service and in 1950 twenty ex-Atlanta cars were shipped to Seoul (together with 32 cars for Pusan). They were en route when in June the Korean War broke out and North Korean communist forces invaded and ruled Seoul for three monthes;the tram system was destroyed heavily again and many cars were lost. Seeking the new cars for system, Korea Electric Co. sent the inquiries to Kansas City Public Service, which offered their 24 pre-war PCCs for sale and to Dallas Railway & Terminal Co. which attempted to sell their 25 Pullman-Standard double-end PCC. While Dallas cars were double-ended and suitable for Seoul conditions, the company decided to purchase more conventional H-class cars from Los Angeles which had the same gauge (3'-6"). However, Seoul always wanted modern PCC cars and when streetcar service was ended in Los Angeles in 1963, two pre-war PCC cars (3007 and 3008) were purchased by equipment broker (with option for 23 more) for shipment to Seoul and Pusan. He had failed to remove the cars from the Los Angeles property by June 1965 (Seoul already purchased 10 new modern cars from Japan in 1964) and they were included in the lot sold to Cairo, Egypt. The last streetcar operated in Seoul on November 29, 1968. If Dallas cars were sold to Seoul, they could be painted in the same green and cream livery (with thin white stripe below the beltrail) and bore the decal showing clasped hands and the words "United States of America" bordered by a stylized USA shield as on ex-Los Angeles H-class cars. Atlanta cars, delivered in 1950, were numbered in 405-424 series (lower numbers were assigned to pre-war Japanese-built cars) and Los Angeles cars received numberd 425 and higher. The PCC cars could be numbered to separate group of 700-series, as 500s numbers were allocated to Songsudong interurban cars and 600s numbers were used for some non-revenue equipment.

Scale 1:48
Available through SPTC, U.S.A./Canada Dealers

5

908

USA1945 Baltimore Transit Co. St.Louis Car Co. PCC 7601.

In February 1944 the Board of Directors of Baltimore Transit Co. authorized the purchase of one car of a radical new design with a new type of braking from the St. Louis Car Company to test. If Baltimore confirmed this order to St.Louis Car Co., the sample all-electric PCC could be individually built together with car 1600 for Pittsburgh Railways Co., being numbered 7601 (as Westinghouse-equipped) in Baltimore fleet.

Scale 1:48

Available through  SPTC, Upside/DownUnder

5

910

USA1940 Atlantic City & Shore Railroad Shore Fast Line J.G.Brill Co. Brilliner (121-series).

During 1939, Brill engineers produced a drawing for a double-end interurban Brilliner intended for use on the Atlantic City - Ocean city Division, which was served by old wooden interurban cars built in 1906 by the John Stephenson Co. High speed trucks equipped with third rail shoes would have been used. However, no Brilliners for the "Shore Fast Line" were ever built, but the double-end design was used for the Philadelphia Suburban Transportation Co. (Red Arrow Lines) order in 1940.

 

Scale 1:48
Available through  SPTC, U.S.A./Canada Dealers

5